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Jane’s Walk Toronto Walk Listings 2018-04-21T17:54:57+00:00

JANE’S WALK 2018

Walk listings are updated regularly as new walks are submitted. To add your own Jane’s Walk to the list, click here.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

Walking is King!
Led by Kristy Tu
11:00 am – 1:00 pm | Meet at St. James Park (King and Jarvis). Look for the girl holding the Jane’s Walk sign!

The City of Toronto introduced the King Street Pilot in November 2017 with the aim of improving transit reliability, speed and capacity on King Street, the busiest surface TTC route in the City. As such, King Street has been getting a lot of attention lately. On our Jane’s Walk, we’ll keep shining the light on the street as we talk about all things King! We’ll walk the full length of the pilot project from Jarvis to Bathurst, as we talk about the past and the history of street, the present, and the future.  What do we like about King? What’s working? What’s not? What more can we imagine for King, and other city streets? Join us for a lively walking discussion! Walk ends at King and Bathurst.

FRIDAY, MAY 4

Walking with babies: the joys and challenges
Led by Sheyda Saneinejad and Jennifer Lee
10:30 am – 11:30am | Meet at parking lot of FreshCo just north of Dundas West subway station

Come and join us on this Walk with our babies. We’ll share insights about the joys and challenges of navigating the city by foot with babies and toddlers in tow. Enjoy a lovely Walk in the west end as we offer tips on making it easier to get around year round as a pedestrian. You’ll be hearing from two moms on maternity leave; one of us is a supermom of 3 and a baby wearing expert, while the other is a first time mom whose profession is to help improve the City’s walking conditions. This walk is open to families of all types. Join us if you’re a mom, dad, grandparent or caregiver. Are you a city planner, traffic engineer or an enthusiast of active transportation? Then join us too! Strollers are welcome. The route will be accessible for wheels.

Embracing the “Connected Community Approach” in KGO
Led by Anne Gloger (2017 Jane Jacobs Prize Winner!), East Scarborough Storefront
11:00 am – 12:45pm | Morningside Crossing – at the SE Corner of Kingston Road and Morningside Avenue. We’ll be at the coffee shop patio with a Storefront pop-up banner.

We’ll begin by thinking back in time to consider what people’s experience of the area was like in the late 1990’s when East Scarborough Storefront was born, and talk about the evolution of the KGO – Kingston-Galloway / Orton Park community from then till now. As we go, we’ll discuss The Storefront’s asset-based approach to community building, which values and leverages everyone’s strengths and aspirations. We’ll share stories of how this approach has led to a Connected Community, where people – despite economic challenges – are learning and creating, finding meaningful work, and building a thriving neighbourhood together. There is an optional steep slope towards the end of the walk to see Morningside Park ravine. It is optional for those who feel they can navigate it. If people prefer to omit this part of the walk, a secondary leader will guide you directly to The Storefront. The Walk will end at The Storefront, 4040 Lawrence Ave East.

Access in the City, Health & Well Being
Led by Anne Johnson Health Centre – 2398 Yonge St.
11:30 am – 12:00pm | Anne Johnson Health Centre – 2398 Yonge St. 

Our Walk will focus on accessibility, safety, health and well being, identifying barriers, public spaces, green spaces, car and foot traffic. This is a community group effort, community members planning this walk are from The Anne Johnston Health Station Consumer Advisory Committees, they are volunteers. Community members who have lived experience with a variety of disabilities will share their stories and ask you to give some thought to what accessibility means to you?…It’s more than just curb cuts and ramps. The sidewalk width and grade, shop entrances and aisle widths can make huge differences; smooth pavements, traffic light signal timing, all add to how easily and safely a person moves around their neighbourhood. Walkers will share along the way examples of accessibility and how the neighbourhood has seen changes over the years, drawing attention to the current state and future goals of accessibility and people friendliness in the community. The Walk will end at the Anne Johnson Health Centre.

Who Cleans Up After Us?
Led by Annette Synowiec, Charlotte Ueta, Stephanie Fernandes – City of Toronto
2:00 – 3:15pm | Nathan Phillips Square, by the letter “T” in the TORONTO sign

Solid waste management is a critical service that is key to the functioning of the City. This Walk will bring to light the immense scope of the City’s waste logistics, debunk the myths of your recycling, and uncover the opportunities for greater diversion from landfill. The Walk will explore ways that the City is at work 24/7 – from collection, to processing, to disposal and all the steps in between. Themes include the process and state of the Blue Box recycling program, the Green Bin organics program and processing, and challenges facing the City as we grow vertically. We will also discuss the implementation of the Long Term Waste Management Strategy and the shift toward making Toronto the first municipality in the Province with a Circular Economy. This Walk will end at 505 Richmond St. West.

HARBORD VILLAGE: an historic downtown neighbourhood
Led by Richard Longley, Architectural Conservancy Ontario
2:00 – 4:00pm | Brunswick House Rexall (SE corner, Bloor and Brunswick)

Harbord Village: who built it, lived, worked, studied and played in it? They include: poet Gwendolyn McEwan, photographers William James and Humphrey Hime, Toronto’s first black postman Albert Jackson, co-inventor of Superman, Joe Shuster, replacement of the firebombed clinic of Dr Henry Morgentaler (who was responsible for abolition of laws against abortion in Canada), when he was a child, Dr Norman Bethune and the six Boys of Major, of whom two returned after world War II. The Walk will end on College Street north of the entrance to Kensington Market, to disperse for happy hour.

Forever Yonge: Transforming the public realm, campus, & neighbourhood
Led by Ryerson City Building Institute with Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ken Greenberg, Dr. Zhixi Zhuang, Steven Ziegler & Molly Anthony
4:00 – 5:30pm | Victoria and Gould Streets – meet at the big rocks at Ryerson Community Park

Yonge Street is downtown’s iconic main street & it’s poised for a major redesign. What could a people-centred redesign –with wider sidewalks, new patios & public spaces, and even full pedestrianization– mean for the neighbourhood and for Ryerson? We’ll walk & talk about how a revitalized Yonge could improve campus quality of life, business vitality, and neighbourhood liveability – and how we can support this bold vision. You’ll hear from some voices with a vision, including: Steven Zeigler, Downtown Yonge BIA; Ken Greenberg, Ryerson City Building Institute; Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam; Molly Anthony, Ryerson Campus Planning; and Ryerson professor Dr. Zhixi Zhuang, urban planner and researcher. We’ll end at the Ryerson Quad (on the Ryerson campus).

SATURDAY, MAY 5

Jane’s Jog— An Explorative Jogging Tour
Led by Jonathan Silver
7:30 – 9 am & 9:30 – 11 am| Meet at the parkette off of Nichol Lane (43.665804, -79.399777)

You may have explored the city by foot or bike, but how about by jogging? For the jogger, the city becomes a different place. The jogger can go where the bicycle cannot, and can cover more ground and see more sights than the walker. The curiosities that are far-away to the walker are nearby to the jogger. Where the walker sees stairs, hills, planters and fences, the jogger sees playground obstacles. Where the city directs, controls and shapes the walker, the jogger transgresses and shapes the city. Looking to energize your body and mind? This Jane’s Jog is for you! We will take breaks at locations think about health in the city, private vs. public space, urban building materials, and more! This tour will include 5 km of medium- to fast-paced jogging. There will be some obstacle-climbing (nothing over 5 feet), and obstacles that require good balance. The group will travel in a single file (more or less) so there will be room to jog at your own pace. We’ll end at Union Station.

Bridging the Don: 100 Years of the Bloor Viaduct
Led by Lori Zuppinger, Todmorden Mills Heritage Site
9:15 – 10:45 am | Meet at southeast corner of Bloor & Sherbourne (outside Sherbourne station). Look for the red Toronto Historic Sites t-shirt.

Opened in 1918, the Prince Edward (Bloor) Viaduct is such an iconic part of the cityscape that it is hard to imagine Toronto without it. But bridging this gap between east and west was a massive challenge – and not just in the technical sense. Join us for a guided walk and learn about the controversy over what was once called a ‘bridge to nowhere’, as well as the viaduct’s impact on the neighbourhoods on either side of the Don Valley. Walk ends at Chester Station.

Along Mimico Creek
Led by Terry & Jay Brown, Patricia Blackstock, Ann Birch & Iona MacKay. Text by Denise Harris.
10 – 11:30 am | Meet at the Tavern at Montgomery’s Inn which faces Dundas St. W. ( just east of Islington Ave.). There will be a sign outside that says Museum Entrance.

We will explore its flora, fauna, ecology, indigenous peoples and its local history. We will end at Montgomery’s Inn Museum.

Time Travel? Walk back to the 1900s & experience early settler life!
Led by Village of Islington ArtWalk
10 – 11:30 am | Meet at the parking lot at Montgomery’s Inn 4709 Dundas West (Look for tour starts here sign) 

You’ll engage with history and mural art first hand. See what BIAs do to beautify local streetscapes. Walk ends at Kipling and Dundas or back at Montgomery’s Inn.

Sculpture and the City
Led by Noel Troxell
10 – 11:30 am | Meet at Henry Moore Sculpture outside City Hall, 100 Queen St. W – look for someone with a clipboard. 

Newcomers to Toronto, visitors and urban dwellers often explore the city and interact with sculpture in the downtown core. But how did the sculpture get there? Who paid for it? Who decided for cows to be in the middle of the TD Centre? Works by Joe Fafard, Anish Kapoor, Henry Moore and others will be part of the tour. This Jane’s Walk will encourage discussion on how sculpture can promote community and place. Please join us as we explore and discuss this rich body of public sculpture. Walk will begin the Henry Moore sculpture at Nathan Phillips Square – I will be holding a clipboard. The sculpture is outside and close to the main entrance of the City Hall building, located at 100 Queen Street West. The Walk will end at Anish Kapoor sculpture at Simcoe Park (255 Wellington street).

Don Mills, the Rainbow Tunnel, and the East Don Trail
Led by Ron Kluger
10 – 11:30 am | Meet at the outdoor Shops at Don Mills, at a bench opposite Salomon Sports and Aroma Espresso

Don Mills was Canada’s first major planned community. We can find its origins and examples of the designs that are still here. We proceed to look at the green space and then through the “Rainbow Tunnel”, the subject of Peter Doig’s famous painting “Country-Rock (Wing- Mirror” and discover the murals inside. We reach the East Don River Trail in an urban wilderness that is being extended to connect to downtown. You can continue to explore on your own or return with the group. There is a very steep and long hill (paved route) into and out of the Don River valley from the plateau above. This Walk will end where it began.

Medical History in Cabbagetown and Regent Park
Led by Peter Kopplin, University of Toronto Medical Alumni Association
10 am – 12 pm | Meet at SW corner of Sherbourne and Carlton at the edge of Allan Gardens

The walk will begin at Carlton and Sherbourne Street in front of Saint Luke’s United Church where Joseph Flavelle was a member when it was Sherbourne Street Methodist. Flavelle was a Toronto businessman and philanthropist who was influential in the building of the Toronto General Hospital on College Street. He was the board chairman at its beginning. Proceeding south on Sherbourne the walk will pass the Rekai Centre nursing home and the Sherbourne Health Centre. This was the site of the original Central Hospital started by the Rekai brothers, immigrant Hungarian doctors to Toronto after World War II. Walk ends at the SW corner of Carlton and Sherbourne.

Facadism 1: architectural crime or movement?
Led by Richard Longley, Architectural Conservancy Ontario
10:00am – 12:00pm | Southeast corner Yonge and Queen Streets. (If early, walk up Yonge, east side, north of Queen and Wintergarden Theatre to witness facadism behind the Bank of Commerce building at the Massey Hall project.)

FACADISM: building new behind or above the facades of heritage buildings is now the default mode of heritage conservation in downtowns where land is precious and demand for it is enormous. Often considered an architectural crime, must facadism be damned or does it deserve respect as an architectural movement? Route includes Yonge Street, Queen to Front (Hockey Hall of Fame and much on the way), Allan Lambert Galleria (William Thomas’s 1844 Bank of the Midland District), Bay Street (Design Exchange), Adelaide Street East (Concourse Building and Bishop’s Block), King Street West (Westinghouse Building), Peter Street (Queen-Richmond Centre West). Plus many other examples of façadism. The Walk will end at Queen and Peter Streets, close to the Black Bull Pub and Ricarda restaurant. Join us for Facadism 2: facidism, it’s everywhere! at 2:00pm.

Steps of Old Lake Iroquois
Led by Gary Shaul
10:00am – 12:00pm | Davenport and Spadina – at the foot of the Baldwin Steps. Watch for the guy in the orange vest with the megaphone.
The Walk start is one block north of the Dupont subway station. Also accessible from Davenport bus. Free parking on Davenport Road.

We will explore historic and current land use along the ridge above Davenport between Spadina & Dufferin. Excellent city views. Who were the first peoples to live in this area? Who were some of the early movers and shakers in Toronto? What was the origin of Wychwood Park and Tollkeeper’s Cottage? Walkers encouraged to add to our growing list of facts! Walk includes a rest stop at the Wychwood Barns Farmer Market. Walk will end at Glenholme & Regal Rd (above Davenport).

Literary Swansea
Led by Swansea Historical Society
10:00am – 12:00pm | Alex Ling Fountain, NW corner of Bloor and Jane across from Jane subway station

A variety of authors and poets have called Swansea home. We’ll pass sites of significance to their lives or their writings and pause to read from the works of Lucy Maud Montgomery, Bernice Thurman Hunter, Raymond Souster, and more. This Walk will end at Swansea Town Hall.

Crosstown: Transforming York South-Weston Through Transit
Led by Metrolinx Eglinton Crosstown Community Relations
10:00am – 12:00pm | Meet at Super Coffee (1148 Weston Road)

Join Metrolinx to discuss aspects of the physical transformation occurring between Weston Road and Blackthorn Ave as part of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT Project. The route will travel along sidewalks on Eglinton Avenue between Weston Road and Blackthorn Avenue. The walk will pass by construction sites along the way. This Walk will end at Westside Mall (2400 Eglinton Ave W).

Keeping Neighbourhood Vitality Alive During Crosstown Construction
Led by Eglinton Crosstown LRT & The Eglinton Way BIA
10:00am – 12:00pm | Meet at Shoppers Drug Mart (550 Eglinton Avenue West)

The Eglinton Way BIA and the Eglinton Crosstown LRT work together during construction to support businesses and ensure the neighbourhood keeps a lively, walkable feel. Learn more about how that plays out on the ground by joining us on a guided tour of Eglinton between Chaplin Crescent and Oriole Parkway. The Walk will take place along the sidewalks on Eglinton Avenue West between Chaplin Crescent and Oriole Parkway. The Walk will pass by construction sites. This Walk will end at the Burger Shack (233 Eglinton Ave W).

Explore Toronto’s “Accidental Wilderness”!
Led by Jane Michener, TRCA
10:00am – 1:00pm | Meet at Nature Centre inside Tommy Thompson Park, about a 5 minute walk along the paved trail from the entrance of the park.

This Walk will explore how cities can create urban wilderness spaces. We will talk about the roles of native vs invasive species and see firsthand the variety of plants and animals that live in our city. There is a main paved trail at Tommy Thompson Park but we will be exploring gravel or uneven trails on the Walk. This Walk will end where it began.

Who Cleans Up After Us?
Led by Annette Synowiec, Charlotte Ueta, Stephanie Fernandes – City of Toronto
10:30 – 11:45am | Nathan Phillips Square, by the letter “T” in the TORONTO sign

Solid waste management is a critical service that is key to the functioning of the City. This Walk will bring to light the immense scope of the City’s waste logistics, debunk the myths of your recycling, and uncover the opportunities for greater diversion from landfill. The Walk will explore ways that the City is at work 24/7 – from collection, to processing, to disposal and all the steps in between. Themes include the process and state of the Blue Box recycling program, the Green Bin organics program and processing, and challenges facing the City as we grow vertically. We will also discuss the implementation of the Long Term Waste Management Strategy and the shift toward making Toronto the first municipality in the Province with a Circular Economy. This Walk will end at 505 Richmond St. West.

Condo Creep & Evolution in Willowdale
Led by Lu Mann
10:30am – 12:00pm | Meet at Bessarion Subway Station’s south entrance off Shepherd Ave east @ 10.25 a.m. Look for a wide brimmed sunhat, medium walking challenge, no washrooms until Bayview Village Mall or McDonalds, Dress for the weather!

This Walk will explore the Condo Development that has been evolving within the Bayview-Leslie and Sheppard Corridor bounded by the 401 to the south & mixed low rise housing to the north(Bayview Village Residential Communities). Walk will end at Bayview Village Mall due East of Bayview Ave & Sheppard Ave East(approx 12 noon.)

William Lyon Mackenzie: Toronto’s First Mayor
Led by Mackenzie House Museum
10:30am – 12:00pm | Courtyard of Mackenzie House Museum at 82 Bond Street. Guide will be wearing a red “Rebel With a Cause” t-shirt.

As the first Mayor of Toronto in 1834, William Lyon Mackenzie faced many challenges: accusations of bias from a divided council; a catastrophic accident at City Hall; the return of cholera to the city, and perhaps his biggest challenge of all, building a city bureaucracy from scratch. “Mackenzie as Mayor: the walking tour” explores this eventful year and how it changed Toronto. Walk ends at St. James Park, near the corner of Church & Adelaide Streets.

Cabbagetown’s Main Streets: Yesterday to Today
Led by Gilles Huot, Cabbagetown BIA
10:30am – 12:00pm | Southwest corner of Sherbourne and Carlton streets (entrance to Allan Gardens). Guide will have a visible hat.

Cabbagetown is known for its Victorian streetscape, (noted by many as one of largest collections of preserved Victorian houses in North America) much of which falls under multiple designated heritage conservation districts. Once peppered with “mom-and-pop” stores, just like the neighbourhood they serve, the main streets went through periods of prosperity and stagnation. Through their history, they’ve been gathering places (parks, churches, theatres, pubs, cafés, etc.). Come walk with us and hear the stories of Cabbagetown’s main streets. They are both are witnesses to Toronto’s history but also an increasingly desired destination, part of a modern vibrant city. This Walk will end at Parliament and Winchester streets.

Wychwood Park – History, Architecture, and Trees
Led by Marilyn Spearin, Community History Project
11:00 am – 12:00 pm | Tollkeeper’s Cottage on the NW corner of Davenport and Bathurst

Wychwood Park is a little enclave of woods, beautiful houses, a pond, a creek, and a lot of history, in the heart of the city of Toronto.
Learn about the geology of the Davenport Escarpment, the Arts and Crafts movement, Eden Smith, centuries old oak trees, and the wych elm on a walk through a peaceful place away from the noise of the city. We meet at the Tollkeeper’s Cottage on the NW corner of Davenport and Bathurst. The walk proceeds 200 steps west to the gate to Wychwood Park, then goes north up the east side of the park, then south down the centre road, circling around the western half of the park, and back to the gate where we entered the park.

Planning East Harbour for Tomorrow
Led by Derek Goring
11:00 am – 12:30 pm | Meet at front door of the Unilever Soap Factory at 21 Don Roadway

Join the First Gulf team on the grounds of what will soon be transformed into East Harbour, your new 60-acre east-end urban destination and the largest commercial development of its kind in Canada. Today, this site is mostly made up of former industrial lands. With many government-led infrastructure projects all planned to occur directly adjacent to East Harbour, these former industrial lands will become part of the surrounding urban fabric for the first time in over 100 years. They will transform into an accessible gateway to the Port Lands and a new destination for the neighbourhood, Toronto and the region. Taking a Walk on former industrial lands, you will get a glimpse of the location for the future Transit Hub, the Don River flood protection, the proposed parks and open spaces, the retail, culture and entertainment amenities and the future office space for over 50,000 employees. After the Walk, you can head into the Unilever Soap Factory to check out the opening weekend for Max Dean’s Exhibition, Still Moving, as part of Scotiabank’s 2018 Contact Photography Festival.

Walking is King!
Led by Kristy Tu
11:00 am – 1:00 pm | Meet at St. James Park (King and Jarvis). Look for the girl holding the Jane’s Walk sign!

The City of Toronto introduced the King Street Pilot in November 2017 with the aim of improving transit reliability, speed and capacity on King Street, the busiest surface TTC route in the City. As such, King Street has been getting a lot of attention lately. On our Jane’s Walk, we’ll keep shining the light on the street as we talk about all things King! We’ll walk the full length of the pilot project from Jarvis to Bathurst, as we talk about the past and the history of street, the present, and the future.  What do we like about King? What’s working? What’s not? What more can we imagine for King, and other city streets? Join us for a lively walking discussion! Walk ends at King and Bathurst.

The French and English Forts of Toronto – Bicycle Tour
Led by David Juliusson, Fort York National Historic Site
11 am – 1 pm | Meet at Lambton House 4066 Old Dundas St, York, ON M6S 2R6

Bicycling is a unique and exciting way to view Toronto’s early history. On May 5, Fort York and Heritage York’s Lambton House will conduct a Janes Walk Ride event. Lambton House, 4066 Old Dundas St. is a good starting point for the tour, being at the edge of the Carrying Place trail. From there, we will ride to Teiagon, the site of the 17th Century Seneca Village and the Magasin Royal of 1720. Following the Humber Bicycle Trails, we will stop and explore the sights of Toronto’s second French fort. Continuing along the Martin Goodman Trail we will go to the site of Fort Rouille, the last French Fort. Fort York is the site of the founding of British York which replaced Toronto’s French era.

Wild Plant Walk in Riverside
Led by Danette Steele, Riverside BIA
11 am – 1 pm | Meet outside of the Queen/Saulter Library Branch (765 Queen St East at Saulter Street)

If you would like to learn to identify local plants that are good for food, medicine and pollinators – come out and enjoy this Riverside Walk, which is also a part of the Riverside BIA’s monthly walking series (May-October – more at www.riverside-to.com). Danette Steele – the herbalist, will share stories about the history, nutritional and medicinal benefits of the plants we find in our parks, laneways and gardens. You will gain new insights into the green world that surrounds us in the city after you meet some wild plant friends – like Dandelion, Motherwort, Plantain and Goosefoot. Bring your travel mug – as yummy herbal teas are provided! Herbal teas available 5 mins before Walk start. This Walk will end at Joel Weeks Park.

CityPlace Discovery Walk: Living & Thinking Vertical
Led by G. Pieters, Local Area Residents/CityPlace Residents Association
11:30 am – 1:30 pm | Meet in front of Canoe Landing Park, 95 Fort York Blvd (SW corner of Fort York & Spadina)

Join the CityPlace Residents Association (CPRA) for a Jane’s Walk through the CityPlace neighbourhood, and learn more about how the CPRA have actively led and curated community building events and activities that embrace living and thinking vertical in this multi-dwelling high density vertical neighbourhood. We will explore Canoe Landing Park, Block 31, The Toronto Public Library Fort York Branch, Privately Owned Publicly Accessible Space (POPS), The Puente de Luz Pedestrian Bridge, and the Chinese Railway Workers Memorial. The walk is about 90 minutes long and will proceed rain or shine, so please dress appropriately and wear comfortable shoes! The Walk will end at the Chinese Railway Workers Monument (Blue Jays Way and Navy Wharf Ct).

From Town to City in the St. Lawrence Neighbourhood
Led by Kat Akerfeldt, Toronto’s First Post Office
12:00 – 1:30 pm | Meet at St. Lawrence Market, 93 Front Street East, on the west balcony, alongside Market Street. Look for the Jane’s Walk sign

Imagine a Toronto where the tallest building is only three storeys high, where Lake Ontario laps against Front Street, and fields and forest begin just north of Queen St. This was what the neighbourhood looked like in the early 1800s. The 1800s saw the Town of York, a colonial outpost, grow into the City of Toronto. Along the way, it faced cholera outbreaks, political and social strife, a great fire, and an armed rebellion led by the city’s first mayor. The Walk will end at Toronto’s First Post Office, 260 Adelaide Street East.

Transit and Transition
Led by Aadila Valiallah and Guikang Jin, York Eglinton BIA and Maria Shchuka Library (TPL)
12:30 – 2:30 pm | Meet at Maria A. Shchuka Public Library, 1745 Eglinton Ave. West 

The theme Transit and Transition has been selected to pick up on the obvious construction chaos along Eglinton – in a positive way. We will explore the theme of infrastructure development and the communities that surround the projects historically, in the present and what it could mean in years to come. Our look at transit includes Belt Line Rail 1892, the Oakwood streetcar 1924, as well as the future Eglinton LRT 2021. The community transitions are a little more nuanced and include neighbourhood commercial districts, the different movements of people into a neighbourhood over time, and community projects. Highlights: a look into an Eglinton transit mining pit with comments from Metrolinx. This Walk will end at Reggae Lane Mural, Green P parking lot 1531 Eglinton Ave W.

Walking the Don: Past, Present and Future
Led by Alex Meyers and Floyd Ruskin, Todmorden Mills Heritage Site and Evergreen Brickworks
1:00 – 3:00 pm | Meet at St. Matthews Clubhouse, 450 Broadview Ave (south end of Riverdale Park East)

In the 1790s, the Don Valley was wild and unspoiled. Over the next two centuries, the river was harnessed, channelled, polluted, moved, and ignored. Join us for a walk through the Lower Don trail system from Riverdale Park to Pottery Road and see how humans have impacted the valley – and how it is being reclaimed as a vital green space at the heart of the city. Join Todmorden Mills and Evergreen’s Don River Valley Park team on a journey through the Don Valley. Walk ends at Pottery Road trail junction (between Broadview and Bayview).

Memorials & Memories: A Cemetery Walk
Led by Sam Sharp and Meredyth Schofield, Gibson House Museum
1:00 – 2:30 pm | Meet inside York Cemetery’s main gate, off Beecroft Road. Staff and volunteers will be on hand at the entrance.

As we explore York History we will discover the history of cemeteries and public spaces, and some of the people who have contributed to our community, country and history. This walk takes place in a cemetery, so while we will be using the paved walkways, we will also be venturing into grassy areas and navigating around trees, plants, and graves. In case of wet weather, we will do our best to limit the amount of time spent on grassy areas, but be prepared for mud. Walk ends at the York Cemetery main gate.

Untangling Spaghetti Junction: the last walk through the interchange
Led by Julie Bogdanowicz, City Planning, City of Toronto
1:00 – 2:30 pm | Six Points Park, south east corner

The Six Points area in Etobicoke Centre is currently undergoing a transformation: the existing highway interchange or “spaghetti junction” intersection of Kipling Avenue, Dundas Street West and Bloor Street West is being demolished to make way for new, green streets with at-grade intersections. The project will liberate five new city blocks (over five hectares of land) for new parks, dense mixed-use development, and potentially the site of the new Etobicoke Civic Centre to anchor the new precinct. While construction is well underway, City of Toronto staff invite the community to experience the current site and envision its future. This is a major city building project that will be transformative for the area and the city as a whole. This Jane’s Walk is meant to change the perception of the area as “a place to drive through” to “a place to go to”. The reconfiguration project has been in the planning stages for over 20 years and the next few years represent the planning work becoming a reality. We look forward to celebrating the transformation with the community. Please note that the walk will take place on public sidewalks that are narrow and next to fast-moving vehicles. We ask that walk participants wear bright-coloured, safety-themed clothing. Come early to meet City staff who will be on site from noon until 3pm. There will be visual material to help the public understand the reconfiguration and the future vision for the land redevelopment. Look for the blue tent and City Planning staff. This Jane’s Walk will be the last and only Jane’s Walk through “the Six Points interchange” before it is demolished. Join us for the last walk. Note: there are a few other Jane’s Walks nearby before this walk from 10 a.m. -11:30 a.m. about Mimico Creek and the murals of Islington Village.

Walk the Sign
Led by Ted Van Vliet, Amina Billah, Brody Paul, Cindy Long, and Nathan Jankowski
1:00 – 2:30 pm | NW Corner of Yonge-Dundas Square – look for a sign

Perhaps more than any other part of the public realm, signs are designed to be noticed. Successful signage contributes to establishing the visual quality of the city’s built environment and public spaces. The character of many neighbourhoods is, in part, determined by the type, number and attributes of signs visible in an area. This tour takes you through four of Toronto’s Special Sign Districts – specific areas of the city where the absence, presence or specific features of signs is intended to compliment the built form and contribute positively to the public realm. This Walk will end at Front St. and John St., at the Ripley’s Aquarium Sign.

Chinatown is Home
Led by George Wong
1:00 – 2:30 pm | Chinatown Centre (222 Spadina Ave.)

Chinatown is Home is a physical exploration of a well known Toronto intersection known as Spadina and Dundas. Participants who come on this walk will learn about three major topics i) Chinatown Before: The history of Chinese immigration in Toronto ii) Chinatown Today: The present day state of our Chinatowns iii) Chinatown Culture: The continuing and changing role Chinatown plays in our communities. This Walk will tackle questions related to city gentrification, the evolving Chinese communities within the Greater Toronto Area, and the changing needs of the Toronto Chinese communities (New immigrants, seniors, youth, and first-generation/second generation Chinese-Canadians).

Beltline and Beyond
Led by Burns Wattie, Cycle Toronto Midtown
1:00 – 3:00 pm | We will meet at the enormous picnic table in the middle of Ben Nobelman park, across the road from Eglinton West Subway Station

Did you know that you can cycle a loop that is almost entirely off road right in the middle of Toronto? The trail and ravine systems consisting of the Kay Gardner Beltline Trail, Park Reservation Trail, David Balfour Park, Yellow Creek, Nordheimer Ravine and Cedarvale Park together form a 16 kilometer loop separated by only 1 km of city side streets. These trails story some of Toronto’s most important urban history, as well as reveal our rich natural history and watersheds. We’ll also be riding on top of three of Toronto’s ‘lost rivers’. Join us as we ride and explore this unique Toronto treasure. This is a cycling, not a walking tour – approximately 16km of mostly light riding and one quite steep hill. You do need a bicycle in reasonable shape. Although the ride is almost entirely on trails, they are generally smooth and rideable by most bikes. The most challenging part will be the hill leading out of the Yellow Creek trail up to Avoca. The section between Avoca and Russell Hill Road is the only section on city side streets, and riders are expected to follow the rules of the road. Participants can decide to complete only a limited part of the loop.

Finding Toronto’s Wild Spaces
Led by Alexander Forest
1:00 – 4:00 pm | This walk will start at Castle Frank Subway Station. Meet just outside the station on the lawn. I will be holding a sign.

On this Walk, I will lead you on a tour of some of my favorite wild spots discovered over years of living and working in the Don Valley. We will discuss the history of these spaces in our city, current city projects in the Don and other natural areas, and the value of access to wild spaces for urban folks. There will be two stops with access to (unfortunately gendered) washrooms and drinking water. However, you would be best to bring a bottle of water. There may be uneven terrain, steep slopes, busy sidewalks, loud noises, stairs, curb-cuts and other inaccessible barriers. Dogs are welcome. This Walk will end at East York Community Center at Pape and O’Connor.

Going Up | Architecture, History and Elevators
Led by Josh Nelson, Elevator Scene Studio
1:30 – 3:00 pm | This walk will start at the Fairmont Royal York. 

Explore elevators and their indispensable role in cities and architecture across Toronto from the turn of the century to the latest advances in vertical transportation industry. See exemplary historical elevators dating as far back as 1894 at the Flat Iron building to panoramic glass elevators overlooking 14 storeys at the Atrium on Bay. Along the way, learn about the role elevators play in modern cities, how we can better think the vertical commute and the technological advances that allowed people to live and work further up then ever before. This Walk will end at the Atrium on Bay.

Landscape Archaeology of Garrison Creek
Led by Jon Harstone
1:30 – 3:30 pm | This walk will start at Christie Pits Park (across from Christie TTC station)

This walk is an exploration of the urban landscape looking for traces of the original Garrison Creek ravine. Our City is a palimpsest; past landscapes are obscured by streets, houses and other improvements. This walk is about finding clues that reveal the original topography. We’re going to look at sewer grates, retaining walls, finished floor levels and trees in an attempt to reconstruct the vanished landscape. This Walk will end at Queen and Gore Vale (Trinity Bellwoods Park).

The Pulse of the Junction; Our Stories
Led by Eugenia Evans & Tuli Parubets
2:00 – 3:00 pm | Meet at the northwest corner of Dundas and Pacific in front of the mural

We will showcase the various murals, architecture, diverse cultures, breweries and businesses while talking about the history of the railroad and its role in the development of the Junction. We will highlight the past, talk about the present and explore its future. We will end on the north side of Dundas in front of Malta Park.

Embedded Art History in Downtown Toronto
Led by Parker Kay, The Centre of Experiential Research
2:00 – 3:00 pm | Meet at Henry Moore’s “The Archer” sculpture in Nathan Phillips Square. I will be standing next to the sculpture wearing a white hat with a “P” on it.

At the centre of the city we find not only traces of histories that have since dissolved but also clues to what might happen next. This walk will explore the art, architecture, and public spaces that quietly tell the story of Toronto’s art history. Participants will stop at look at these sites that are typically rushed by in the chaos of financial district as a way to meditate on how they contribute to the city dweller’s experience and how they contribute to Toronto’s urban identity. This Walk takes places in the high traffic area of the financial district. Traffic and pedestrian awareness is key. This Walk will end in the newly re-imagined Berczy Park.

The Steam Punk Tour
Led by Eric Charron, Megan Edmonds, Jack Gibney, Daryl Landau, Ellen Moorhouse, Mona Paris
2:00 – 3:00 pm | Meet outside the Liberty Village Market Cafe, 65 Jefferson Avenue, well be in steam punk costumes.

Join the Sunnyside Historical Society for an examination of old versus new in the Liberty Village area. We are witnessing an explosion of development in Toronto and the inevitable clashing visions of residents, industry and builders. On our “Steampunk” walk, we will focus on the issues surrounding 25 Liberty Street, an industrial building with an interesting and important past that sits in the path of rapid redevelopment. Why Steam Punk? It’s a style combining Victorian steam and futuristic sci-fi, a tribute to the potential marriage of old and new. On our short walk around 25 Liberty, we will consider the architectural features of heritage importance. We will also discuss other buildings in the area with similar post-and-beam construction. Back at the Liberty Village Market Café, we will have a brief slide show to explain the locale’s history and the impact of steam, automation and industrial activity. We will also pay tribute to the Indigenous roots and legacy (by the way, do you know where the name Liberty Village came from? You’ll find out!). Here’s an opportunity for you, the audience, to participate in some healthy activism à la Jane Jacobs. And why not have some fun? Put on some Steampunk attire, and demonstrate just how stylish blending the past and edgy future can be! This Walk will eb a circuit starting and ending at the Liberty Village Market Café, 65 Jefferson, and walking clockwise from there.

Facadism 2: facadism, it’s everywhere!
Led by Richard Longley, Architectural Conservancy Ontario
2:00 – 4:00pm | John Lyle Studio Starbucks 1 Bedford Road. (North of Bloor St West, Varsity Stadium, opposite Bedford exit St George subway.)

FACADISM: building new behind or above the facades of heritage buildings is now the default mode of heritage conservation in downtowns where land is precious and demand for it is enormous. Often considered an architectural crime, must facadism be damned or does it deserve respect as an architectural movement? The Walk will end at Bloor Street West at St Thomas St., opposite former University Theatre/Pottery Barn. (Close to Varsity cinema, Yorkville and numerous restaurants.)

Made in Canada – Behind the Scenes Tour
Led by Cecelia Pye, Trinity Bellwoods BIA
2:00 – 4:00pm | Meet at Comrags at 812 Dundas Street West. I will have a sign.

The Trinity Bellwoods BIA, along Dundas from Grace to Bathurst Street, has a strong mix of new and established owner-operated businesses. Learn about the history, the neighbourhood’s Portuguese roots, and the influx of businesses that produce their products in-house. We will go behind the scenes as we visit businesses to see the inner-workings of production: Comrags, a women’s clothier, Fredrick Prince, a jewellery maker, Bookhou, a silk-screen bag maker, Hide, a leather-maker, Odile Chocolat, a chocolatier, and The Six Brewing Co., the newest microbrewery on Dundas St West. This Walk will end at The Six Brewing Co. at 777 Dundas Street West.

Fantastic Toronto: A Tour of Speculative Fiction
Led by Dorianne Emmerton and Stephen Geigen-Miller
2:00 – 4:00pm | City Hall – Nathan Phillips Square – we’ll meet at the stage; I will be brandishing a light sabre.

Join Science Fiction and Fantasy fans to explore Toronto’s history of contributions to SFF, including literary landmarks and the local settings of some of our favourite books. We’ll also talk about some of Toronto’s notable TV and movie appearances, with the walk starting at futuristic City Hall. Our tour of local sites that have been featured in a diverse array of SFF (including YA and horror) will include a visit to the Merril Collection, which houses over 72,000 items of science fiction, fantasy and other speculative fiction. We’ll end at Bakka-Phoenix, Canada’s oldest SFF bookstore, where there will be refreshments and a chance to peruse the books and mingle.

Walking with babies: the joys and challenges
Led by Sheyda Saneinejad and Jennifer Lee
2:30 pm – 3:30pm | Meet at parking lot of FreshCo just north of Dundas West subway station

Come and join us on this Walk with our babies. We’ll share insights about the joys and challenges of navigating the city by foot with babies and toddlers in tow. Enjoy a lovely Walk in the west end as we offer tips on making it easier to get around year round as a pedestrian. You’ll be hearing from two moms on maternity leave; one of us is a supermom of 3 and a baby wearing expert, while the other is a first time mom whose profession is to help improve the City’s walking conditions. This walk is open to families of all types. Join us if you’re a mom, dad, grandparent or caregiver. Are you a city planner, traffic engineer or an enthusiast of active transportation? Then join us too! Strollers are welcome. The route will be accessible for wheels.

Animal Sculptures of Downtown Toronto
Led by Edward Wente
3:00 – 5:00 pm | Meet on the second floor of the Eaton Centre, near the foot bridge to the Bay at the southern end, to the right of the information desk. More or less directly above Queen Subway station.

A Walk focused on the different animals in downtown Toronto. It will incorporate in various topics including architecture, art, history, and wildlife biology. This Walk will end at St. Patrick Subway station, at the corner of Dundas and University.

Walk as Workout
Led by Lee Scott/WoW Power Walking

3:30 – 4:30 pm | Meet at the first parking lot on the left after entering Humber Bay Park west via Humber Bay Park Road West. Look for Lee by the public washrooms. She’ll be wearing a brightly coloured vest.

Join international fitness presenter, power walker and Toronto citizen, Lee Scott, as she takes you on a fun and informative walk. Research shows that cardiovascular, bone, and brain health improve when we exercise. Learn how rethinking your daily walk can improve posture, strength, heart health, and happiness. Let’s talk about how you can make that happen outside in our beautiful city. We’ll take our walk along the shores of Lake Ontario for a real mood boost and appreciation of Toronto’s waterfront trail. The Walk will end at our start position in the parking lot.

Walking into Nature Change
Led by Susan Aaron
4:00 – 5:00 pm | Meet at St. Clair W subway station south side entrance

This walk winds through a city ravine to engage our collective culture built into the watershed and recapturing the collective life of people and nature. You are invited to ‘walk’ into that life as you are asked to create it with assistance. The forest holds the remnants and potential of Indigenous stewarding, landscaped watershed ecosystems, linear urban water re-direction and into natural environment and sustainability- you weave life amidst these natural elements on the ‘walk’ as immersion and potential. We will end at 150 Boulton drive.

Little Italy: Exploring Natural and Built Heritage
Led by Farah Michel
4:00 – 5:30 pm | Meet at the Johnny Lombardi Piazza (College and Grace Street) – I’ll be holding a Jane’s Walk sign!

This Walk explores one of Toronto’s most historically significant sites; a place of remarkable natural and built heritage. By walking through the site and calling attention to noteworthy landmarks (or where noteworthy landmarks used to stand), this Walk will acknowledge the site’s history as a prominent centre of immigration and humble beginnings starting from the late 19th century, and will trace its development into a vibrant, demographically diverse neighbourhood whose cultural authenticity may be at risk of getting lost amidst developers’ plans for its commercial growth. This Walk will end at Trinity Bellwoods Park.

Uncovering the Tales and Treasures of Ossington
Led by Melinda Medley and Brian Sharwood, Ossington BIA
4:00 – 5:30 pm | Meet at 2 Ossington Ave.

The Ossington Strip has undergone a transformational change. And within this change there are some amazing tales and tidbits that often go forgotten. In addition, we will discuss some of the gems and treasures of the Ossington Community. This Walk will end at 224 Ossington Ave.

Toronto Islands Sunset Walk
Led by Nicolas Bello
6:00 – 8:30 pm | Meet inside the ferry docking area. **People participating in this Walk will need to pay the fee to cross the ferry ($7.71).**

Long to learn more about the rich history of the Toronto Islands? Participants will gaze at the ‘white elephant’ Ferry Terminal, creep by a haunted lighthouse, see a giant hedge maze, and more. We’re taking the 6:15PM Hanlan’s Point ferry. NOTE – walk proceeds rain or shine so dress appropriately. Well behaved, leashed pets are encouraged to attend too. This Walk will end at the Ward’s Island Ferry Dock.

Ghost Walk – Exhibition Place
Led by Steve Collie
7:00 – 9:00 pm | Meet at General Services building (2 Manitoba Drive – Fleet and Strachan)

Exhibition Place is known for its bright lights and entertaining shows and events, but lurking below the surface are many well-kept secrets that, until this walking tour, were primarily known only to staff who work the late shift. That the grounds should harbour otherworldly visitors is not much of a surprise: the Horticulture Building was once used as a temporary morgue; the current site of the midway was a bloody battlefield during the War of 1812; and the grounds were once home to two military forts. Not to mention the CNE’s own long history, going back to 1879 – plenty of time and plenty of reasons for an accumulation of “things that go bump in the night.” To join us, take the 511 or 509 streetcars and get off at the Strachan Avenue stop. The General Services Building is just to the north. Free parking for tour participants at the General Services Building. Walk leader and volunteers will be outside the General Services Building with a sign. Walk ends at Scadding Cabin (Exhibition grounds) – walk leader and volunteers will walk back to the General Services building, passing the TTC/GO station after the end of the tour.

SUNDAY, MAY 6

Half Marathon Walk
Led by Leehe Lev, Whole Self Living

6:30am – 10:30 am | Meet at Glen Cedar Bridge. At 6:30am there isn’t many people there. I’ll be dressed appropriately for the weather and the distance.

This 21 km walk takes you over numerous bridges and through many parks and trails, covering Toronto and North York. Leehe is a Personal Trainer and will give you tips along the way to insure you listen to your body and avoid injury. There are two bathroom stops along the route. Other bathrooms are off the route but we can decide as a group whether to go off course to use facilities. Bring snacks, water and proper shoes. Dress for the weather. This Walk will end at Leslie Station.

Walk as Workout
Led by Lee Scott/WoW Power Walking

9:45 – 10:45 am | Meet at the first parking lot on the left after entering Humber Bay Park west via Humber Bay Park Road West. Look for Lee by the public washrooms. She’ll be wearing a brightly coloured vest.

Join international fitness presenter, power walker and Toronto citizen, Lee Scott, as she takes you on a fun and informative walk. Research shows that cardiovascular, bone, and brain health improve when we exercise. Learn how rethinking your daily walk can improve posture, strength, heart health, and happiness. Let’s talk about how you can make that happen outside in our beautiful city. We’ll take our walk along the shores of Lake Ontario for a real mood boost and appreciation of Toronto’s waterfront trail. The Walk will end at our start position in the parking lot.

Facadism 1: architectural crime or movement?
Led by Richard Longley, Architectural Conservancy Ontario
10:00am – 12:00pm | Southeast corner Yonge and Queen Streets. (If early, walk up Yonge, east side, north of Queen and Wintergarden Theatre to witness facadism behind the Bank of Commerce building at the Massey Hall project.)

FACADISM: building new behind or above the facades of heritage buildings is now the default mode of heritage conservation in downtowns where land is precious and demand for it is enormous. Often considered an architectural crime, must facadism be damned or does it deserve respect as an architectural movement? Route includes Yonge Street, Queen to Front (Hockey Hall of Fame and much on the way), Allan Lambert Galleria (William Thomas’s 1844 Bank of the Midland District), Bay Street (Design Exchange), Adelaide Street East (Concourse Building and Bishop’s Block), King Street West (Westinghouse Building), Peter Street (Queen-Richmond Centre West). Plus many other examples of façadism. The Walk will end at Queen and Peter Streets, close to the Black Bull Pub and Ricarda restaurant. Join us for Facadism 2: facidism, it’s everywhere! at 2:00pm.

Along Mimico Creek
Led by Terry & Jay Brown, Patricia Blackstock, Ann Birch & Iona MacKay. Text by Denise Harris.
10 – 11:30 am | Meet at the Tavern at Montgomery’s Inn which faces Dundas St. W. ( just east of Islington Ave.). There will be a sign outside that says Museum Entrance.

We will explore its flora, fauna, ecology, indigenous peoples and its local history. We will end at Montgomery’s Inn Museum.

Settling in the City: Corktown Neighbourhood
Led by Alice McMurtry, Ontario Heritage Trust and The Enoch Turner Schoolhouse Foundation
10 – 11:30 am | Meet inside the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse, 106 Trinity St, Toronto

Corktown, one of Toronto’s oldest areas, retains a rich stock of domestic, industrial and institutional heritage buildings. Its name refers to the large number of Irish immigrants who lived in the area in the 1800s, many of whom embarked from Cork. Traditionally a working class area, Corktown is undergoing substantial change as new residents and businesses move into the area. Join us as we explore the homes, factories, places of worship, and businesses that made Corktown the centre of life for many 19th century immigrants! This Walk will end where it began.

Birchcliff , Rosetta McClain and the Bluffs
Led by Lucille Yates.
10 – 12:00 pm | Meet at the corner of Birchmount Road and Kingston Road.

We will talk about the History of the Area and the formation of the Scarborough Bluffs and the erosion control to save them. We will end at Kingston Road and Glen Everest Road, (close to the start of the walk).

Condo Creep & Evolution in Willowdale
Led by Lu Mann
10:30am – 12:00pm | Meet at Bessarion Subway Station’s south entrance off Shepherd Ave east @ 10.25 a.m. Look for a wide brimmed sunhat, medium walking challenge, no washrooms until Bayview Village Mall or McDonalds, Dress for the weather!

This Walk will explore the Condo Development that has been evolving within the Bayview-Leslie and Sheppard Corridor bounded by the 401 to the south & mixed low rise housing to the north(Bayview Village Residential Communities). Walk will end at Bayview Village Mall due East of Bayview Ave & Sheppard Ave East(approx 12 noon.)

Adventures in Urban Farming
Led by Ran Goel, Fresh City
11 – 12:00 pm | Meet at the South-most greenhouse outside 70 Canuck Avenue in Downsview Park

Farming in the city is not for the faint of heart. In this walk, Fresh City founder Ran Goel will walk – and talk – you through how they have farmed in Toronto for eight growing seasons against the odds. Traversing through the farm can be tricky after a good rain. Be sure to bring your rain boots if it rained the day before! This Walk will end where it begins.

Stories of Spadina
Led by Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre and FENTSTER
11 – 1:00 pm | Meet at FENTSTER, 402 College St. in front of the window gallery

Travel back in time to an era when Kensington Market was a thriving Jewish village teeming with kosher bakeries, synagogues, and social clubs. On this tour, Jewish Toronto’s past is brought to life. Visits to the architectural gems that remain in the area today are supplemented by stories and photographs from the holdings of the OJA as vivid reminders of a once vibrant community. This year, we’re putting a new spin on the OJA’s popular Stories of Spadina tour with special stops at FENTSTER and the Standard Theatre to coincide with the exhibition “A Place of Wholesome Amusement” that explores the historic intersections between the Chinese and Jewish communities. Walk ends at the Standard Theatre on the northeast corner of Spadina Ave. and Dundas St.

Give Me Liberty or…Just Give Me Liberty!
Led by Jaymz Bee
11:00 am – 12:20 pm | Meet at the corner of 171 East Liberty (at Hannah) across from The Local. (They open for breakfast at 10). I will be impossible to miss as I carry a bullhorn.

Liberty Village is a neighbourhood that is constantly evolving. It has a rich and sometimes scandalous history and for the past decade has changed so much locals call Liberty East, “Inception”. Every time you enjoy a coffee a new building goes up! The walk will end at 7 Fraser, where a path can take you directly to the go station or walk a couple blocks West to the Dufferin bus. Also a Green P is at Fraser and Liberty for those driving.

Walk the Sign
Led by Ted Van Vliet, Amina Billah, Brody Paul, Cindy Long, and Nathan Jankowski
1:00 – 2:30 pm | NW Corner of Yonge-Dundas Square – look for a sign

Perhaps more than any other part of the public realm, signs are designed to be noticed. Successful signage contributes to establishing the visual quality of the city’s built environment and public spaces. The character of many neighbourhoods is, in part, determined by the type, number and attributes of signs visible in an area. This tour takes you through four of Toronto’s Special Sign Districts – specific areas of the city where the absence, presence or specific features of signs is intended to compliment the built form and contribute positively to the public realm. This Walk will end at Front St. and John St., at the Ripley’s Aquarium Sign.

Historical Cannabis Designations
Led by Matt Mernagh
1:00 – 2:30 pm | Hotbox Cafe (look for the uniquely dressed pothead). 

Local efforts at creating a Toronto marijuana culture have played a significant role in Canada’s cannabis legalization legislation. Three spots in particular are worthy of ‘first ballot’ Heritage Toronto recognition for their contribution to ending prohibition. With legalization looming learn the exciting roles Rochdale College, Hotbox Cafe, and Vapor Central have played. Discover Toronto’s cannabis community, hear astounding tales of peaceful civil disobedience, and ponder ‘Do these buildings and people deserve Heritage Toronto plaques?’ Matt Mernagh is a best selling cannabis author, co-founder of 4/20 Toronto, and has challenged the constitutionality of Canada’s cannabis laws. Distance from Hotbox to Rochdale is 1.8km and Rochdale to Vapor Central 1.4km. There will be breaks where I’ll be speaking. We will not be entering the venues, but Vapor Central does have stairs. This Walk will end at Vapor Central.

Exploring Broadview: Todmorden to Riverdale
Led by Claire Ricci, Todmorden Mills Heritage Site
1:00 – 3:00 pm | Southwest corner of Broadview and Pottery Road

Broadview Avenue – once a “mere wagon track, winding among trees and underwood” – connects a number of diverse neighbourhoods and fascinating slices of Toronto’s history. From the river’s earliest mills to one of the city’s newest landmarks, join us as we explore two centuries of change east of the Don. We’ll meet at the southwest corner of Broadview and Pottery Road. Look for the red Toronto Historic Sites t-shirt. The walk ends at the Riverdale Library, corner of Broadview and Gerrard.

Beltline and Beyond
Led by Burns Wattie, Cycle Toronto Midtown
1:00 – 3:00 pm | We will meet at the enormous picnic table in the middle of Ben Nobelman park, across the road from Eglinton West Subway Station

Did you know that you can cycle a loop that is almost entirely off road right in the middle of Toronto? The trail and ravine systems consisting of the Kay Gardner Beltline Trail, Park Reservation Trail, David Balfour Park, Yellow Creek, Nordheimer Ravine and Cedarvale Park together form a 16 kilometer loop separated by only 1 km of city side streets. These trails story some of Toronto’s most important urban history, as well as reveal our rich natural history and watersheds. We’ll also be riding on top of three of Toronto’s ‘lost rivers’. Join us as we ride and explore this unique Toronto treasure. This is a cycling, not a walking tour – approximately 16km of mostly light riding and one quite steep hill. You do need a bicycle in reasonable shape. Although the ride is almost entirely on trails, they are generally smooth and rideable by most bikes.

Vanished Buildings in Trinity-Bellwoods Park
Led by Jon Harstone
1:30 – 3:00 pm | We will meet at the corner of Queen and Gore Vale.

There’s a lot of history that has disappeared in or near Trinity-Bellwoods. This is a Walk in the park to look for things past: we will look for the location of 6 bridges, 42 houses, a war of 1812 Block House, a brewery and a University campus that have demolished. But not everything is gone; a Bitternut Hickory that is two hundred years old still stands to remind us of the forests that were once here. This Walk will end at the corner of Queen and Crawford.

What is a Housing Co-op?
Led by Laura Herbert and Charles Palmer
2:00 – 3:00pm | Parliament Square Park (44 Parliament St.); look for the rainbow umbrella.

This walk will explore the mixed-income, diverse St. Lawrence Neighbourhood housing cooperatives and will serve as an introduction to the concept of housing cooperatives in Toronto by co-op members. We will discuss the history, the architecture, the democratic governance, the benefits and challenges of membership, the current status of cooperatives, and their potential in the City’s affordable housing strategy. This Walk will end at Market St. and the Esplanade.

Building Neighbourhoods on the Lake
Led by Adam Vaughan, M.P., Spadina-Fort York
2:00 – 3:00pm | Meet at the entrance of The Waterfront Neighbourhood Centre and I will be hold a sign with the Walk title. 

We will be walking the waterfront between The Waterfront Neighbourhood Centre and Harbourfront Centre exploring the growing neighbourhood in this area.

Sculpture Hill – High Park in 1967
Led by Bianca Lakoseljac, Swansea Historical Society
2:00 – 3:30pm | SE corner, Bloor Street and High Park Avenue

Few places provide as much personal inspiration in Toronto as High Park. Did you know that in 1967 an Art Symposium was held within the park as a Centennial Project and added ten sculptures to Sculpture Hill? We’ll explore the artistic and literary significance of High Park including Sculpture Hill with author Bianca Lakoseljac, who has featured High Park prominently in her work, and the Swansea Historical Society. This Walk will end at Sculpture Hill in High Park.

Revitalizing Guild Park with People Power
Led byJohn Mason, Friends of Guild Park
2:00 – 3:30pm | Meet by the flagpole in the front grounds of Guild Park, 201 Guildwood Pkwy.

This Jane’s Walk describes how citizens are revitalizing a Toronto landmark. Guild Park is 88 acres of nature, history and art. In 1932, the site became the Guild of All Arts, home to artists, sculptors and artisans. The Guild Inn was added to host local guests and international celebrities. The gardens were outdoor galleries for art and architectural fragments. This legacy was almost lost after various government agencies took over the site. In 2012, community involvement began to reverse decades of “demolition by neglect.” This walk highlights how Guild Park is being transformed by volunteer-led activities, plus more than $25 million of new investment and major plans. Limited benches are available along walk. Please bring drinking water. Walk ends at the same place it starts.

ROMWalk – Arts & Entertainment
Led by ROMWalks volunteers
2:00 – 3:30pm | North median at Queen and University (in front of South African War Memorial). Look for the purple umbrella.

The Arts and Entertainment walk will focus on the city’s cultural and recreational life and the buildings involved. Aspects of the historical development of the area will be included, as well as reference to renowned Canadian artists, entertainers and their patrons. Along the route we will discuss selected works of public art that reflect the theme. This Walk will end at David Pecaut Square.

Sunnyside et les plages de l’ouest
Led by Isabelle Montagnier and Lisette Mallet, La Société d’histoire de Toronto
2:00 – 3:30pm | Entrée du pont piéton à l’intersection des rues King, Queen, Queensway et Roncesvalles.

*This Walk will be led in French.* Vous connaissez sans doute le « Palais Royale » et ses bals au clair de lune ainsi que le pavillon Sunnyside, vestige du grand parc d’attractions qui occupait ces lieux avant la construction de l’autoroute Gardiner. Mais connaissez-vous l’histoire de Marilyn Bell, une jeune fille de 16 ans qui a traversé le lac Ontario en grand secret et de nuit ? Et celle de sir Casimir Gswoski, ingénieur, fonctionnaire … et héros romantique de la fin de l’époque victorienne? Venez revivre les années folles de Toronto en faisant une belle promenade le long du lac, sur une portion du sentier transcanadien qui nous mènera jusqu’aux berges de la rivière Humber. La rampe piétonne du pont enjambant les autoroutes pourrait constituer une difficulté pour les fauteuils roulants sur le chemin du retour.

Facadism 2: facadism, it’s everywhere!
Led by Richard Longley, Architectural Conservancy Ontario
2:00 – 4:00pm | John Lyle Studio Starbucks 1 Bedford Road. (North of Bloor St West, Varsity Stadium, opposite Bedford exit St George subway.)

FACADISM: building new behind or above the facades of heritage buildings is now the default mode of heritage conservation in downtowns where land is precious and demand for it is enormous. Often considered an architectural crime, must facadism be damned or does it deserve respect as an architectural movement? The Walk will end at Bloor Street West at St Thomas St., opposite former University Theatre/Pottery Barn. (Close to Varsity cinema, Yorkville and numerous restaurants.)

Summerhill Summerdale
Led by John van Nostrand, SvN Architects + Planners
2:00 – 4:00pm | Fountain on the south side of Summerhill LCBO (former Railway Station)

The urban history and evolution of the Summerhill and Crescent Park (Rosedale) Neighbourhoods as well as the Yonge Corridor and Yellow Creek Valley that define them. Bring your binoculars for bird-watching in the city! Walk will begin and end at the Fountain on the south side of Summerhill LCBO (former Railway Station).

Time Travel? Walk back to the 1900s & experience early settler life!
Led by Village of Islington ArtWalk
3 – 4:30 pm | Meet at the parking lot at Montgomery’s Inn 4709 Dundas West (Look for tour starts here sign) 

You’ll engage with history and mural art first hand. See what BIAs do to beautify local streetscapes. Walk ends at Kipling and Dundas or back at Montgomery’s Inn.

SUNDAY, MAY 13

Aggie’s Wildflower Walk
Led by Madeleine McDowell
1:30 – 3:00 pm | Lambton House, 4066 Old Dundas Street

Explore the woods and river flats of Lambton Mills through the eyes of the 19th century. The area was a favourite spot of artist Agnes Dunbar Moodie, daughter of pioneer writer Susanna Moodie. Perhaps Agnes used the flowers here as models for her paintings, published in an 1867 book called Canadian Wild Flowers. Hear stories of ‘Aggie’ and the history of this area while we look for the wildflowers that inspired her. Return to the Lambton House for refreshments.

Toronto Graffiti Walk
Led by Kathy, Hidden Toronto
12:00 – 1:30 pm | Meet in front of TD bank at the SW corner of Queen & Spadina, and I will have a camera with me and a sign.

Kathy, a local photographer with an extensive graffiti photo archiving going back to 1994, and a local artist will do a walk of the well known queen alleyways and talk about the changing artwork and past history of this now well known area. Walk will start at Spadina and continue a few blocks past Bathurst toward Trinity Bellwoods to a lesser visited section.

FRIDAY, JUNE 1

The Last “eXpressway”
Led by Lance Gleich, Heritage York
6:15 pm | porch of Lambton House, 4066 Old Dundas Street

The history of highway trailers riding on railway flat cars dates back to at least 1952 in Canada. Today, there’s just one train left providing such a service in Canada, Canadian Pacific’s “eXpressway” between Milton, Ontario and Montreal, Quebec. That service is ending, and today we’ll watch the final “eXpressway” train to go through Toronto in daylight pass. After the train goes by, we’ll return to the Lambton House where you are welcome to enjoy Heritage York’s Pub Night. We’ll tailor the walk to who is in attendance, but if dominated by photographers, the best spot in the area to photograph the train is off normal trails.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2

Recreation and Community in Swansea
Led by Swansea Historical Society
2:00 -3:30 pm | Bennett Park (10 Gothic Avenue, adjacent to the High Park subway station)

Many of the places that residents of the village of Swansea visited to recreate and socialize have disappeared. Visit some of these locations, and discuss how they compare to their contemporary replacements. This Walk will end at Swansea Town Hall.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

ROMWalk – Arts & Entertainment
Led by ROMWalks volunteers
6:00 – 7:30pm | North median at Queen and University (in front of South African War Memorial). Look for the purple umbrella.

The Arts and Entertainment walk will focus on the city’s cultural and recreational life and the buildings involved. Aspects of the historical development of the area will be included, as well as reference to renowned Canadian artists, entertainers and their patrons. Along the route we will discuss selected works of public art that reflect the theme. This Walk will end at David Pecaut Square.

SUNDAY, JULY 8

ROMWalk – Arts & Entertainment
Led by ROMWalks volunteers
2:00 – 3:30pm | North median at Queen and University (in front of South African War Memorial). Look for the purple umbrella.

The Arts and Entertainment walk will focus on the city’s cultural and recreational life and the buildings involved. Aspects of the historical development of the area will be included, as well as reference to renowned Canadian artists, entertainers and their patrons. Along the route we will discuss selected works of public art that reflect the theme. This Walk will end at David Pecaut Square.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1

ROMWalk – Arts & Entertainment
Led by ROMWalks volunteers
6:00 – 7:30pm | North median at Queen and University (in front of South African War Memorial). Look for the purple umbrella.

The Arts and Entertainment walk will focus on the city’s cultural and recreational life and the buildings involved. Aspects of the historical development of the area will be included, as well as reference to renowned Canadian artists, entertainers and their patrons. Along the route we will discuss selected works of public art that reflect the theme. This Walk will end at David Pecaut Square.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

Annual Simcoe Walk
Led by Swansea Historical Society
9:30 – 4:00pm | Part I – Rousseaux Site (8 South Kingsway near the Queensway). Part II – Alex Ling Fountain (NW corner of Bloor and Jane across from the Jane subway station) (begins at 1pm)

In September 1793, Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe left Lake Ontario exploring possible transportation routes northward, starting with the “Carrying Place” along the Humber River. In this annual event, the Swansea Historical Society re-traces the first day of Simcoe’s journey. Participants are welcome to just experience the morning walk as far as Bloor Street, the afternoon walk north toward Eglinton Flats, or the entire day (bring a lunch or try a restaurant in Bloor West Village during the break).

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